Cut-Throat Syndrome – Let Slip the Dogs of War

The Spoils of War – In Editing Hell for the past several weeks, I’m roughly three-quarters of the way through the first full edit, constantly reminding myself it WILL be worth it. So far, so good. Cut-Throat Syndrome, the fourth book in the Lance Underphal Mystery series, polishes up nicely. Busy fine-tuning its cross-genre premise, […]

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Five Tips (Minus 4) for Would-be Bestselling Writers

Writing Fiction – Looked simple enough. Write a mystery novel. Hire an agent. Get published. Find a writer’s retreat in the woods or by the sea, and do nothing but write. As it turns out, that’s a fine piece of fiction all by itself. Makes you wonder how Hemmingway did it. But then, he committed […]

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Writing—Everybody’s Doing it! So Can You

Everybody’s Doing It – I saw a statistic in a recent blog – “85% of readers dream of publishing their own book.” This may or may not be accurate, but I wouldn’t be surprised. The trick on this planet is turning a dream into reality. Most of us are here to do just that—turn dreams […]

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A Rose By Any Other Name . . . The Zeitgeist Of Writing Style

A Rose is a Rose – Or so the story goes. As mystery writers, our craft involves more far than mystery. There’s that all-elusive element of style—highly subjective, to say the least. Of course, there are basics which every writer worth his or her salt incorporates into their prose. Then we get down to choices. […]

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Self-Published Writers and the Shiny Object Syndrome

DISCLAIMER: At one time or another I’ve been guilty of all the things I deride below. Every now and then something hits me like a bolt from the blue and I can’t repress it. In an idea session at Starbucks with a long-time friend, the Shiny Object Syndrome came up and KABOOM! S.O.S. – Debilitating […]

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Lance Underphal Mystery Books: Research Notes

Making It Real – In one of my early forays into manuscript submission I happened upon an article by bestselling author, L. Ron Hubbard entitled Search for Research. Hubbard begins by acknowledging that all writers want to sell and write more and better stories. He proceeds to state that writers are the laziest people on […]

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